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-seltzer on facebook. ♪ >> we thought we'd bring you some good news this week. the international energy agency reported monday that the the u.s. is likely to surpass saudi arabia as the world's largest oil producer as early as 20/20 and predicts that the u.s. will increase production to 11.1 million barrels a day by 2020, up to about 6.9 million barrels in 2008. that is if the obama administration allows it. so, steve, you've been out to the shale in north dakota where it's coming from, and fracking so-called, and drilling and private risk taking. what does it mean for the u.s. energy markets? >> well, this is such a great, great pro american stir and by the way, paul, it's not just oil, it's also natural gas. >> paul: right, sure. >> my goodness we have more natural gas than the rest of the world combined and it's driven by the technological improvements and a five or ten year technological lead than the countries we're competing with. it's interesting, paul, if you look the at the last three or four years, now what industry has created more than any other industry in the united states. >> pa
, and fracking so-called, and drilling and private risk taking. what does it mean for the u.s. energy markets? >> well, this is such a great, great pro american stir and by the way, paul, it's not just oil, it's also natural gas. >> paul: right, sure. >> my goodness we have more natural gas than the rest of the world combined and it's driven by the technological improvements and a five or ten year technological lead than the countries we're competing with. it's interesting, paul, if you look the at the last three or four years, now what industry has created more than any other industry in the united states. >> paul: the electric car industry, steve? (laughter) >> no, not that one. oil and gas and the thing that's so amazing, the president is doing almost everything he can to try to hold this back with regulations and with not allowi allowing permitting most of the oil and gas development is going out on private land and where the president has to get with the program because we could literally create millions more jobs if we get this story right. >> paul: jim, the consequences here economica
violence of course. we have great guests on the show, including public citizen energy director and edward isaac dovere. but i guess the real important story is that mc hammer came out and sang [ inaudible ] at the american music festival. >> is that what happened? >> john: yes. >> i can't wait to tell my grandchildren that this one-hit wonder cy went on with mc hammer. >> john: yes, cy came -- >> deep it going dan. ♪ >> john: cy came out and lip sinked. he is playing the studio version, and then mc hammer comes out and [ inaudible ] his third biggest hit -- >> this sounds like a train wreck. >> john: if you listen very very closely to this you can hear the founding fathers weep. and we'll be talking about david petraeus. because there is now a backlash of people saying why should he have to resign? the obvious answer is because he is the biggest spy in america and spies get fired for less. but what do you think? if america needs him running the cia, if he can do for america what he did for afghanistan, why would you want him leaving? >> yeah. >> john: please feel free
. and let's get going. together. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy? 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. so i can get the energized feeling i need and support a great cause? i'm sold. pink lemonade 5-hour energy? yeah and a portion of every sale goes tohe avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. i'm sold. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy. get the alert, energized feeling you need and support breast cancer research and access to care. lou: amassed a best seller on the sub ministration. republican leaders in washington about this very thing. whether they are right or wrong, i don't know. they believe in their hearts that this president is trying to go over the cliff. he has looked at the polls. nearly all of them say, if we go over, it's the republicans who people are going to blame. the republican. lou: it is a silly thing not begun negotiations. think about the pollster who posed the question, inviting such silliness and absurdities as to make a decision about something that has not transpired is not even begun. no foundation for blame. >> can'tou
with climate change and energy. and he seemed to really downplay any expectations of sweeping energy and climate change legislation. saying instead that he was focusing first on the economy and creating jobs. >> i am a firm believer that climate change is real, that it has impacted -- as a consequence i think we have an obligation to future generations to do something about it. and understandably i think the american people right now have been so focused and will continue to be focused on our economy and jobs and growth that if the message is somehow we're going to ignore jobs and growth simply to address climate change, i don't think anybody's going to go for that. i won't go for that. >> reporter: now, wolf, president obama said that more needs to be done. but he says he wants to have a national conversation talking to scientists, elected officials, engineers. so keeping it very broad. not getting into specifics. not talking about the sweeping energy and climate change legislation. but when you're talking to folks on both sides of this, those who are environmentalists, those who ar
guess. >> john: let me say one thing in john mccain's defense. he has more energy than most 40 -year-olds i know. he proves that age is nothing but a number every day. i would never make fun of his age. i would make fun of his desperation and his desperate case to stay relevant with the tea party that despise him in his own republican wing. >> caller: nation has no appetite to go back to war anywhere. let's resolve the issues we've got. and you know, work peacefully. >> john: i agree jack. you're right. thank you very much. i'm glad -- it is 3:30 where you are. i wish you a great day. it won't be light for another six hours. thank you jack from oregon. we'll be taking your calls and i'll be joined by dan glickman now from the bipartisan policy center. i'm john fuglesang. this is the "bill press show." good morning. fast max. use as directed. (vo) cenk uygur is many things. >>oh really? >>"if you ever raise taxes on >>the rich, you're going to destroy our economy." not true! [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] on your radio and
conversation with david petraeus. >>> if you're drinking five-hour energy drink this morning, you should know it's being investigated to possible links of 13 deaths over the course of four years according to the "new york times," citing fda records n a statement the company says, quote, it's unaware of any deaths proved to be caused by consumption of five-hour energy thanchts twi . >>> that twinkie in your lunch box could be the last for quite some time, hostess in a striking situation with its workers. fear not, fate of the ring ding, some of hostess' most iconic treats could get bought up by other companies at auction. >>> at the start of his first term, president barack obama cited the influence of one of lincoln book -- the influence of one of the many lincoln books out there, "team of rivals" by making his cabinet picks. i'm having trouble speaking this morning. i apologize for that. anyway now that obama is starting off his second term, cast and crew inspired by that same book. a.j. hammer is here to tell us more. >> oscar buzz already. when you are the president and the film's director
energy and bio tech. he's governor of washington state. today andrew cuomo came out and said he will be asking for $30 billion for new york state in storm relief. that money would be in part to shore up new york's infrastructure so it can withstand storms of increased frequency and increased severity due to climate change. so while the new governor of washington will be out fighting climate change, the governor of new york is asking for money to make us more resilient to damage from climate change. maybe even climate change heading off further climate change, maybe that could be in the realm of possibility for a second term. what about the things that we know the president wanted to accomplish in his first term? he wanted to get done in his first term and didn't do. what about closing guantanamo? remember when that was the plan? maybe that's back in the realm of possibilities. let's go out on a wild hair. what about ending the war in afghanistan ahead of schedule? could a second obama term see the war ending earlier? what's within the realm of possibility now? what can democrats
revolution has reenergize north american energy markets and is fundamentally reshaping energy policy. if you think about drones and the war on terror and what technology has allowed, a footprints' the -- a footprint that is more effective in getting bad guys without much involvement on the ground, is the changing technological environment working to overturn established power orders or to reinforce the established power orders? david. >> as you say, this is an ebb and flow and always has been, just as the american stance of when we want to intervene and when we want to pull back has gone in a cycle. the technological flow has gone in a much faster cycle. in the past 10 years, i think it has reinforced american power. if you look at what president bush was doing in his second term and what president obama has doubled down on and triple down on in his first term, what you see is an exploitation of these technologies to try to replace traditional, on the ground kinds of wars of attrition that we have traditionally been in. drones are a great example, as you mentioned. there were 48 or 49 drawn
technological revolution has reenergize the american north american energy market and is fundamentally reshaping global politics short -- toward the traditional powers in the west rather than away from them, you think about drones, the war on terror, technology has allowed a lead foot print that is far more effective in many respects, at least at the specific task of getting bad guys without much direct involvement on the ground than anybody would ever have imagined a few years ago. it's a changing technological environment working to overturn established powered orders or to reinforce establish power orders. >> that is open to all of you. >> as you say, this is an ebb and flow and always has been, just as the american sense of one we want to intervene and when we want to pull back. whether you believe it is a 70 year cycle or in a year cycle or whatever, the technological flow goes in a much faster cycle. so in the past ten years, for sure, i think it has reinforced american power because, as you look at what president bush was doing in his second term, what president obama has doubled down on
, afghanistan/pakistan and u.s. energy policy as the six top issues. so starting with that, looking at it strategically, do you feel that those are the core issues before president obama and this administration and our country going into 2013? um, if not, what would you change, what would you add? >> i -- when i was informed by lori murray about the outcome of the process by which the world affairs councils went through and came up with those six issues, i thought you had it exactly right. i think those are the big issues, and congratulations to you. i think you have them just right. i think there is an overarching issue on top of all of them that in some sense effects and enables all of them x that is if you look at at the national security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic
to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. bill: i want to show you new video of the newly elected members of congress arrive, i guess you could call it for the first day of school, continue you? folks from washington state, california, indiana as well. newly elected congressional members now coming for their new member orientation. so we just wanted to share this with you and have a look at what is happening for the beginning of their new life. martha: back to school. lawmakers returning to work on capitol hill this morning after a seven-week vacation, the ones who already held jobs there. priority number one is trying to reach some kind of deal to avert the so-called fiscal cliff. the u.s. is facing mor
. presumably they felt they could win and they spent the time energy and money to put on the ballot that because the coalition when they would come out with a religious argument with you saw were fair-minded religious leaders standing up countering what they were saying and that's something we haven't seen as aggressively in the past. they also are simply losing support. i was on a panel today and this was much more exciting with brian browner once the national organization for marriage and he is desperately spinning and he talks about the state that he talks about how they were outspent this time. they had seen their support shrank. they're not going to go away and they will learn their lessons and i agree with patrick. i think they could come back in a very forceful way that they have seen their support shrank. they have seen their grassroots support strank strength in their donor base shrink. the mormon church is a player we did not see in these campaigns. they were the dominant player in prop 8. you also saw a lot of individual donors on that side that were not there this time w
atomic energy agency. cnn's senior international correspondent matthew chance has more. >> wolf, it's another highly critical report of iran's nuclear program from the u.n.'s nuclear watchdog. it's filled of course with stuff about how iran continues to fail to cooperate with u.n. inspectors and refuses to answer questions about the alleged military dimensions of its nuclear activities. iran of course says its nuclear program is for purely peaceful purposes. but of most concern say western diplomats is the fact that iran has stepped up its capacity to enrich uranium adding more sen ri fujs to its highly secured underground bunker at a place built into a mountain to defend it against potential air strikes. the report says iran has effectively doubled its enrichment capacity there theoretically making it able to have material for a bomb much more quickly than it could do previously. to report, not exactly a game changer perhaps. but still a very worrying document for those countries who like the united states iran's nuclear program very suspiciously indeed. wolf. >> matthew, thank you
of issues including tax reform, the national debt, energy and immigration policy. >> christine, you were in iowa giving a speech, as well, weren't you? did you run into each other? >> no, but they were all buzzing about how he was going to be there and democrats are saying look, here we go again. republicans are saying marco rubio. already in iowa they were talking about the precursor to 2016. >> would have been a good sighting for you. meanwhile how about this for a sighting? justin bieber took top honors sunday night at the american music awards. winning the artist of the year award, along with two other trophies. even brought his mom onstage to celebrate. gotta love someone who does that. nicki minaj won for favorite rap hip-hop album and favorite rap hip hot artist. taylor swift kept up her streak winning her fifth consecutive award for favorite country startist. and you can definitely call carly rae jepsen new partist of the year. >> about 19 minutes past the hour this morning. we're getting an early read on your local news making national headlines. from the odessa american in texa
capital is a big drag, but on the other hand, there's energy prices low. you've got a low relatively -- natural gas, you got housing, having apparently hit bottom, starting to turn, so there's a variety of things. there's a lot of money on the sidelines. >> you raised china. talk about china for a second. the united states, europe, japan, latin america, asia excluding china, every one of those regions experienced a financial and economic crisis in the last 20 years. china stands out as not having gone through such turmoil. can they continue? can they keep that up? is china the next country that we have to worry about for some kind of economic upheaval? >> i'll start. well, the short term, i think what's important for people to understand this year with the political transition is the chinese leadership has a real fear of inflation, and this goes back to 89. they were going o error on the side of being careful with food prices, higher inflation. now that they are threw that, what you start to see if they've got the resources to be able to avoid a hard landing, but the critical questio
tax reform. we could have energy legislation. we haven't even had a defense bill or appropriations bill or cybersecurity. joe lieberman is still trying to get the cybersecurity bill which is really important for this country. really dangerous. but the president, he is our leader. he needs to engage more. we got somebody here in the room that can talk to him. i'm incurable optimist. i think he may do it. >> well, i think it's got to start in this lame-duck session that begins tomorrow. we can't adopt a total bipartisan balanceed budget agreement but we can get -- balanced budget agreement but we can get started. we can have a down payment at least to cover the first year of what otherwise would be the sequester which is $110 billion, and i think we got to prove we can do some tax reform and we can do some entitlement reform and pull it together. and then adopt a process that tries again to push the committees -- according to the regular order -- to come out with enough savings and spending, enough new revenue as part of tax reform and most critically long-term entitlement reform. t
kind words about me. taxes is growing by leaps and bounds. this is made our country much more energy independent and has brought the price of natural gas down. i hope we can agree we don't want to reverse that and continue to go forward with these wonderful changes that have taken place in energy. we have a chance to see a renaissance in manufacturing. a lot of these jobs going overseas may come home. i have been asked and i would make three quick points. i think this election was about a lot of things. i think it is more complicated than that. i would start with the candidates. mitt romney is a good man. he wasn't as natural a communicator as the president . he had a habit of saying things that didn't help him. the president is a natural and gifted communicator. the democrats had a much better get out the vote operation. republicans need to focus on that. democrats were better in the swing states in getting at the base. the third thing is the following. 55% of moderates voted for barack obama for president. why did the republicans lose the moderates? the farther right positions gove
's what i had sort of driving my career, and she poured all of her energy and time and effort into taking my sister and i on auditions and horseback riding and ice skating and tap dancing -- megyn: maybe too much as it turns out. >> yeah, very intense. very over the top. so it's a story that i think is relatable on that level, a lot of people have, well, i mean, some other people -- megyn: well, you don't know where it's going to go with your mom, because you're pretty harshly critical of her, but you recount the stories of what she did to you and how much, you could say abuse, that she put you through, and you don't know how it's going to end. i'm reading this thinking, is she still, you you know, talkino her mother? are they on speaking terms after she wrote this book? what's the answer to that? >> the story itself comes to a shocking and explosive end. as you said, you don't know how this can all resolve. and, you know, my mom makes some decisions in the end that i find pretty appalling, we end up -- our whole family sort of falls apart. and we haven't had a relationship for more than
idea and harness some of the energy around the idea and help some of the individual part of the party going forward. i think he'll help them. >> you were with the president in iowa a emotional place for him. he doesn't have anymore campaign ahead of him. give us a short picture what it was like being with him as it was coming to an end. >> he's not a very publicly emotional guy as most people know. he said later that he was struck by the last event. everybody is tired. you're the walking dead. both campaigns. every reporter. you're trying to make it through. but he looked out that night and saw all these faces of a these people who believed with him and with him in 2007. i don't mean random faces. i mean, three or people he actually recognized and knew and kind of waivedded at him and waived back. and that's struck him. i think it impacted him. you could see he got a little emotional. he was reflective as it sounds like romney was as well. i remember morning of the election we were waiting to do the interviews the day of election. he said i thought how about romney and his supporters
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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